• Visual Communications (map)
  • 120 JUDGE JOHN AISO STREET
  • LOS ANGELES, CA 90012
  • USA

ACROSS, BEYOND, THROUGH

AWP 2016 Los Angeles — Offsite Reading

TAYO LITERARY MAGAZINE + THE FEMINIST PRESS


TAYO Literary Magazine The Feminist Press proudly present "ACROSS, BEYOND, THROUGH," an off-site reading at the 49th annual AWP Conference & Bookfair in Los Angeles.

THURSDAY, MARCH 31, AT 7:00PM

VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS // 120 JUDGE JOHN AISO STREET
LOS ANGELES, CA 90012 // HOSTED BY TAYO EDITORS:
MELISSA R. SIPIN / BEL POBLADOR /  JANICE SAPIGAO

FEATURING

rajiv mohabir // kenji c. liu // angela peñaredondo // ana castillo


Rajiv Mohabir is the Winner of the 2015 AWP Intro Journal Award and the 2014 Intro Prize in Poetry by Four Way Books for his manuscript entitled, The Taxidermistʻs Cut (March 2016). He received fellowships from VONA/Voices of Our Nation's Artist Foundation, Kundiman, and the American Institute of Indian Studies language program. His second manuscript, The Cowherd’s Son, won the 2015 Kundiman Prize. He was also awarded a 2015 PEN/Heim Translation Fund Grant for his translation of Lalbihari Sharma’s Holi Songs of Demerara, published originally in 1916. Winner of the 2014 Academy of American Poet’s Prize for the University of Hawai‘i, his poetry and translations are internationally published or forthcoming from journals such as Guernica, The Collagist, The Journal, Prairie Schooner, Crab Orchard Review, Drunken Boat, small axe, The Asian American Literary Review, Anti-, Great River Review, PANK, and Aufgabe.

Kenji C. Liu is a 1.5-generation immigrant from New Jersey, now in Los Angeles. His debut poetry collection, Map of an Onion, is the national winner of the 2015 Hillary Gravendyk Prize and a finalist for the 2014 Hong Kong University International Poetry Prize. His work is published in the American Poetry Review, Los Angeles Review, The Collagist, Barrow Street Journal, The Rumpus, Asian American Literary Review, CURA, Split This Rock's Poem-of-the-Week series, and many others, including the anthologies Dismantle and Orangelandia. His poetry chapbook You Left Without Your Shoes was nominated for a 2009 California Book Award. A recipient of fellowships from Kundiman, VONA/Voices of Our Nation's Artist Foundation, Djerassi Resident Artist Program, and Community of Writers at SV, he holds an MA in Cultural Anthropology and Social Transformation.

Angela Peñaredondo’s forthcoming book, All Things Lose Thousands of Times, is the regional winner of the 2015 Hillary Gravendyk Prize. Born in Iloilo City, Philippines, Angela is a poet and artist living in southern California. She is a recipient of a University of California Institute for Research in the Arts Grant, Zora Neal Hurston Poetry Award, Gluck Program of the Arts Fellowship, Dzanc Books International Literary Program Scholarship, Tin House Scholarship, University of Los Angeles California Community Access Scholarship in poetry and others. She is also a VONA/Voices of Our Nation's Artist Foundation fellow and author of the chapbook, Maroon (Jamii Publishing). Her work has appeared in the Asian American Writers' Workshop's The Margins, Four Way Review, Southern Humanities Review, Tuesday; An Art Project, Cream City Review, and elsewhere.

Ana Castillo is a celebrated Chicana poet, essayist, editor, activist, novelist, and translator. She earned a BA in art from Northwestern Illinois University, an MA from the University of Chicago, and a PhD from the University of Bremen, Germany. She is the editor of La Tolteca, a journal devoted to “promoting the advancement of a world without borders and censorship.” Her first novel, The Mixquiahuala Letters (1986; reprinted 1992), won the American Book Award from the Before Columbus Foundation. Her works of fiction include the short story collection Loverboys (1996) and the later novels Peel My Love Like an Onion (2000), nominated for the Dublin Prize, The Guardians (2007), which was named a best book of the year by the Chicago Tribune, and Give it to Me (2014), which was published by The Feminist Press and awarded the 2014 Best Bisexual Fiction by the Lambda Foundation. Castillo’s forthcoming book, Black Dove (Paloma Negra): Essays on Mi’jo, Mamá and Me, is forthcoming from The Feminist Press in early May 2016. Her numerous honors and awards include the Sor Juana Achievement Award from the Mexican Fine Arts Center Museum in Chicago, the Carl Sandburg Award, a Mountains and Plains Booksellers Award, and fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts in both fiction and poetry.

 

Many thanks to Visual Communications for hosting!


A few words from the TAYO Editors: 

What struck us deeply were the threads and thematic/associative tissues among the four writers: in Rajiv Mohabir’s work, he says: “It’s like calling daal split pea soup, something that I’ve heard my parents do in order to be legible,” and “I refuse to have a simple narrative. I refuse to write only in one language.” Kenji C. Liu’s work: “After you, we crossed many borders” and “This bypass is our family, is our paddle.” Angela Peñaredondo’s work: “the declaration of tongue” and “A call for rain, a call for water.” And finally, Ana Castillo’s work: “When the world in its entirety, / and all that you hold sacred advise you / against it: love me still more.” Come to a reading where each poet writes across, beyond, and through boundaries, whether they are boundaries of nation, identity, or language.

See you at AWP 2016!